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Chris (email link at the bottom of each page)

Faith with Humility and Trust in God

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Jesus was amazed at the centurion's faith. Nowhere in Israel had he found such faith as in this Gentile, a representative of a hated foreign oppressor. What was it in the centurion's behaviour that so impressed the Lord? The disposition with which he approached Jesus can be summed up in two words: faith and humility. He had complete confidence in Jesus's ability to heal his servant, and he was so humble that he did not consider himself worthy to have Jesus come into his house.

What did the centurion see in Jesus that gave him such faith, when many of the Jewish leaders were not open to Jesus's message? He was a man in authority and recognised Jesus’s absolute authority over sickness and evil. But this was not just his own shrewdness; only the work of God's grace in his heart could have brought him to such a position of faith.

It's with these same two attitudes that we should approach Jesus during this season of Advent. We need to be humble enough to see our weaknesses and neediness, and we should have complete faith in the power of Jesus to heal us and cleanse us from our sins. So perfectly do the centurion's words sum up the way we should approach Jesus that they have been incorporated into the liturgy. We say them just before our most important encounter with Christ, our reception of his body and blood. Advent is a time when we prepare for the coming of Christ into our lives in a special way, and we can take these words to heart as we begin this season.

The same is true for us: only God can bring us to see who Jesus really is and our need for him, and we must be open to his work within us. If we approach Jesus with faith and humility this Advent, inviting him into our lives, we shall find that he will work powerfully within us and give us far more than we imagined. Let us be expectant that he will do great things for us in the coming weeks.

Lord Jesus, we are not worthy to receive you, but we know that if you say the word we shall be healed.

 

lsaiah 2:1-5 • Psalm 121(122):1-9 • Matthew 8:5-11

Chris 
 
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The Parable of the King's Ten Servants

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A slightly different account of today's Parable of the Talents appears in Matthew's Gospel (see 25:14-30).  Matthew mentions only three servants, whereas Luke has ten, and there is a substantial difference between the sums of money involved.  Furthermore, in Luke's version the servants are given an equal amount, whereas in Matthew's a differentiation is made.

Luke is explicit about Jesus’s motive in telling his parable.  As verse 11 makes clear, he wants the people to understand that the fact that he is approaching Jerusalem doesn’t mean that the kingdom is is close at hand.  The man of noble birth must go away “into a far country to receive a kingdom and then return” (v. 12).

In the meantime, his servants are given responsibilities that they must fulfil. The servants – in other words, we as disciples – are not to put their feet up (so to speak), relax and rest on their laurels.  Instead, they are to devote their lives to the building up of God's kingdom on earth (see Acts 1:8-11).

The bottom line of the parable is that from those who are given much, much is expected.  The servants who produce a return from what they are given respect their master and understand his importance as king. On the other hand, the servant who fails to provide a return has a faulty or disordered understanding of his master, fearing him and seeing him as  “ . . . a hard man. You take up what you did not lay down, and reap what you did not sow” (v. 21).

We who have been blessed with so many graces must produce much in return. If we cultivate a healthy understanding of who God is, we will produce a rich harvest.  If, however, we have a misguided or wrong understanding of God, and see him as judgemental, harsh, unforgiving, unloving, etc . . ., our return will be small.

Lord God, may I serve you with all of my heart, soul and strength, and produce the fruits of the Holy Spirit: love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control.

 

2 Maccabees 7:1, 20–31 • Psalm 16(17): 1, 5–8, 15 • Luke 19: 11–28

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Faith and St Teresa of Ávila

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Luke 12:1–7 • St Teresa of Ávila (Memoria!)

 

Fear of God is not a virtue we often come across nowadays, but it was cherished by the ancients and seen as the beginning of wisdom. This great virtue needs to be recovered in our own time and lives.

What does it mean to fear God? Consider that he – who governs the sun, moon, oceans, earth, stars and cosmos – also knows when a mere sparrow falls down. Consider that the power of the Almighty – revealed in tumultuous waves or the shifting of tectonic plates – is also the One who counts all of the hairs on our heads. God is worthy to be both loved and feared.

We are called to fear God, which leads to a reverence for our neighbour. St Teresa of Avila points us in the right direction. She was a great woman of prayer, and was so full of the life of God that she would often lose consciousness of herself and become 'one' with God. This mystical union is the highest form of existence, and indicates our infinite value. In his Letter to the Ephesians, Paul speaks of living to the 'praise of his glory' (1:14). Our destiny is therefore for us to be brimming with God's fullness.

For St Teresa, the “Way to Perfection” – as she described the union with God – was not possible without taking up the cross in a life of prayer and penance. 

She was also very human. Once, when her coach overturned and landed in the mud, she questioned: “Lord, why did you do that to me?" On hearing the reply, “That is what I do to all my friends”, she retorted, “It is not surprising then, Lord, that you have so few of them!"

We may think that the mystical life is unachievable for us. But as a Doctor (i.e. Teacher) of the Church, St Teresa guides and inspires our prayer life, so that we eventually come to be united with God, to the praise of his glory!

We can only learn to know ourselves and do what we can - namely, surrender our will and fulfil God's will in us.' (St Teresa of Ávila)

Chris
 

Romans 4:1–8 • Psalm 31(32):1–2, 5, 11 • Luke 12:1-7

 

 

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The Sign of Jonah and Repentance

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http://www.ingodsimage.com/2016/04/the-sign-of-the-prophet-jonah/

Luke 11:29–32

On several occasions the Jews demanded miraculous signs (see Matt. 12:38; Mark 8:11), but Jesus rejected these requests because their motives were wrong.  In today’s passage Jesus says that those who demand a sign would indeed be given one – but only the sign of Jonah (v.29).  Jonah spent three days and three nights buried in the belly of a whale, just as Jesus would spend three days and three nights buried in the belly of the earth.

Jesus goes on to say that if the Queen of Sheba had responded positively to the teaching of Solomon and the people of Nineveh to the preaching of Jonah, how much more should the Jews respond to his ministry, as he is infinitely greater than either Solomon or the Queen of Sheba?  How did the people of Nineveh respond to the teaching of Jonah?  The repented.  Repentance is the only correct response when we come to embrace and accept God’s Word.  We need to cultivate an “incarnational awe” or an “incarnational adoration”, whereby, through the grace of the Holy Spirit, we can grasp more clearly who is Jesus.

Jesus was and is God’s revelation of himself.  Pope St John Paul II reflected, “The whole of Christ’s life was a continual teaching: his silences, his miracles, his gestures, his prayer, his love for his people, his special attention for the title and the poor, his acceptance of the total sacrifice on the cross for the redemption of the world and his resurrection are the actualisation of the word and the fulfilment of revelation.”

In the same way that a Roman coin would have displayed different images for the Emperor Caesar and then his son and successor, so in Christ we meet the living Scriptures – the Word made flesh.  Fidel Castro once said: “I’ve always considered Christ to be one of the greatest revolutionaries in the history of humanity.”  He was right, but in fact Jesus was so much more than a revolutionary, so much more than a king of a prophet – because Jesus is God.

“Although Christ was God, he took flesh;  and having been made man, he remained what he was, God.” (Origen)

Chris
 

Romans 1:1–7 • Psalm 97(98) 1–4 • Luke 11:29–32

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Guardian Angels

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 Photo by Zoltan Tasi on Unsplash

Matthew 18:1-5, 10

Today we celebrate the feast of the Guardian Angels. The Catechism of the Catholic Church says: “From its beginning until death, human life is surrounded by their watchful care and intercession.  Beside each believer stands an angel as protector and shepherd leading him to life. Already here on earth the Christian life shares by faith in the blessed company of angels and persons united in God” (para. 336).

Are you comfortable with this teaching? Do you think it's a spiritual reality that is relevant to our daily lives? For sure, in our post-modern and post-Christian society, belief in angels and their opposite, demons, can be – for many – hard to accept and embrace. The Church, however, has always stood firm in its affirmation of this doctrine of faith because angels have been present since creation and throughout the history of salvation.

Therefore, when confronted with aspects of our faith that we find hard to accept, we are encouraged by Jesus to adopt the disposition of a child (Matt. 18:4). What does this mean? After all – as every parent and guardian knows – children do not always display the qualities of a saint, which is why they need their parents. And also, as is self-evident, the nature of life is to grow and mature into adulthood. When we were children, we thought and acted like children, but now as adults we think and act like adults (see 1 Cor. 13:11). Jesus, of course, is referring to a fundamental disposition in children: an openness, a trust, an innocence, which, when adopted by Christians, becomes the impulse of faith which puts all their hope and trust in God.

Greatness then, as far as the kingdom of heaven is concerned, is to do with the heart and our interior disposition. The child of faith in us can easily and readily accept that we and all believers have a guardian angel. Armed with this attitude we pray to our angel, asking for every spiritual blessing and for a pouring out of God's grace upon our lives.

 

'Angel of God, my guardian dear, 

to whom God's love commits me here,

ever this day, be at my side, 

to light and guard, rule and guide. Amen.

 

Chris
 

 

Baruch 4:5–12, 27-29 • Psalm 68(69):33–37 • Proper of Saints: Matthew 18:1–5, 10

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Who do you say that I am?

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Haggai 1:15–2:9 • Psalm 42(43):1–4 • Luke 9:18–22

image from http://heartsofcompassioninternational.blogspot.com/2012/08/how-to-hear-from-god-part-1.html

A Chinese proverb says that a person who asks a question is a fool for five minutes, but one who does not ask a question remains a fool forever. There are a number of key questions in life which we ignore at our peril. What is the purpose of life on earth? What happens after I die? Is death the end or is there an afterlife?

In today's Gospel reading we encounter another important question, the answer to which sheds light on each one of these existential questions. It s the question that Jesus put to his disciples and continues to put to every man and woman on the face of the earth. He asks you and he asks me: “Who do you say that I am?" (v. 20). The answer to this question is the gateway to unravelling the meaning of life and to solving the mystery of what happens after we die. The answer to this question is crucial for our lives on earth and our eternal destiny.

When Peter uttered his famous declaration that Jesus is 'the Christ of God', Jesus realised that a Watershed had been reached in the disciples' understanding of who he is.  It was  recognition that Jesus is more than a prophet; he is more than a great teacher: he is the Son of God.  What revelation has made known is that Jesus Christ was God made man.  The very Lord, Creator and King humbled himself by becoming a human being: he was made one of us, became one of us, and lived like one of us.

To be able to grasp this truth and allow it to shape our lives requires a grace of revelation – mere flesh and blood, the power of our own reasoning, cannot grasp this most sacred and profound of Christian truths. The following words were spoken by St Augustine many centuries ago, but they still have a tremendous impact today: “[Jesus] was created of a mother whom he created. He was carried by hands that he had formed. He cried in the manger in wordless infancy, he the Word without whom all human eloquence is mute.”

Jesus assumed our humanity that we might become God. (St Athanasius)

 

 
 
Chris
 
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When the Storms of Life Assault Me

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Matthew 14:22–36
 
Jesus retired to a private place to pray.  He knew the importance of refreshing himself in communion with his Father.  During the night he walked across the water to meet his disciples and calmed the storm.  We face many storms that frighten us and which threaten to overwhelm us, but when matters seem at their worst Jesus is with us saying, “Do not be afraid.”.  It brings us peace.
 
It is typical of Peter’s impetuosity that without thinking he got out of the boat and walked towards Jesus.  It is also typical that his faith wobbled as he focused on the power of the storm and not on Jesus.  He began to sink.
 
Peter called on the Lord for help.  We can identify with Peter’s humanity, his love for Jesus, his sudden fear and his call to Jesus to help him.  Peter’s actions here exemplify many of our experiences in trying to live the Christian life.  When Jesus call us we are attracted to him and try to step out in faith to reach him.  If we keep our eyes and mind fixed on him all is well, but when storms and crises arise we are distracted from our faith in the Lord.  But Jesus will still any storm and deliver us from any situation when we have faith.
 
It is at times of trial and challenge that we most need to turn to the Lord.  Focusing on our problems leads to darkness and to despair, but keeping our mind focused on Jesus will lead us to safe harbour and peace.  Jesus does not promise to make our problems disappear, but he promises that he will be with us through them all, and that we will be able to find peace and calm in him – instead of being overwhelmed by life’s tumultuous waves.
 
Jesus, increase my faith in you, so that when the storms of life assail me I may put my trust in you to lead me safely to my heavenly home.
 

Chris

from Bible Alive

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He is Risen

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John 20:1–9 or Mark 16:1–7
 
Depicton of a rock tomb with the entrance open
Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash
Easter Sunday
 
Our faith is rooted in real and historical events.  Jesus of Nazareth was born in the town of Bethlehem, grew up in Nazareth and minstered in Galilee and Jerusalem; he died on the cross at Calvary and rose again on the third day.  All these events are historically verified by reliable witnesses: the birth and the ministry of Jesus by the historians Josephus and Pliny the Younger, the resurrection by the disciples.
 
In about AD 56 Paul wrote, “I delivered to you as of first importance what I also received, that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the scriptures, that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day and that he appeared to Cephas, then to the twelve.” (1Cor. 15:3–5).  Paul is referring to what we can call the living tradition of the resurrection and we are inheritors of this living tradition today.
 
However, primary evidence for the resurrection of Jesus from the dead is a sign, and a confusing one at that: the sign of the empty tomb.  None of the Evangelists witnessed the actual event, only its aftermath, if you like.  Why is this?  Of course, like many subjects in relation to faith, in order to understand we need first to believe: faith comes before understanding.  In accepting and believing that Jesus of Nazareth rose from the dead, we can enter its mystery.
 
When Jesus rose from the dead an “evolutionary leap” occurred and a new kind of life broke forth from the tomb.  This new life is outside the boundaries of time and space that we know and understand.  Although it occurred within history, Jesus’s resurrection is beyond history, meaning that nothing like this has happened before.  The resurrected Jesus has revealed a new life, a new existence, one that is set free from the corruption of sin and death.
 
The disciples experienced the Lord as a risen and real person and laid down their lives for this faith.  Perhaps the truth of Jesus’s resurrection can be grasped only with the eyes of faith.  Today we open wide these eyes of faith and let the light of the resurrection radiate and illuminate our lives.
 
Jesus Christ, you are risen today, death has been swallowed up in victory, a new life shines forth.  Today of all days, O Lord, I want to know you and the power of your resurrection.
 
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I believe Jesus is the Son of God

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Jesus incensed the Pharisees by claiming to be one with the Father, in effect claiming to be God (v. 33).  Since stoning was the punishment under the law in cases of blasphemy, they picked up their stones. Appealing to the authority of Scripture, and quoting from Psalm 81(82) verse 6, Jesus argued that if in  this psalm men could be called 'gods', how much more appropriate was it that the one whom the Father had set apart and sent into the world should be given this title? He provoked them further by inviting them to believe that the Father was in him and he in the Father (v. 38). Despite the hostility of the leaders, many came to believe in him.

The essence of Jesus’s mission was to reveal his Father and to fulfil his will. Each of us is on a pilgrimage back to the Father, who loves us totally and unconditionally.  It delights the Father when we worship his Son, and the Son rejoices when we worship the Father in spirit and in truth.  Each day we can rediscover and be renewed in the love the Father has for us.

Speaking of the depth of the relationship between the Father and the Son, St Irenaeus said: “No one can know the Father apart from God's Word, that is, unless the Son reveals him, and no one can know the Son unless the Father so wills. Now the Son fulfils the Father's good pleasure: the Father sends, the Son is sent, and he comes. The Father is beyond our sight and comprehension; but he is known by his Word, who tells us of him who surpasses all telling.  The Son performs everything as a ministry to the Father, from the beginning to the end, and without the Son no one can know God. The way to know the Father is to know the Son: knowledge of the Son is in the Father and is revealed through the Son.”

Lord Jesus, I believe that you are God's only Son, sent by the Father to redeem us. I believe you are in the Father and the Father is in you. I believe not just because of the miracles, blessings and grace in my own life, but because of who you are.  Lord Jesus, I believe in you, and my heart sings with gratitude for the gift of faith I have received.

Jeremiah 20:10-13  • Psalm 17(18):2-7 • John 10:31-42

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The "Sent Ones"

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Mark 3:13–19

Jesus is the Father's Emissary.  At the beginning of his ministry he appointed twelve men to be his emissaries (apostoloi). In the same way that the Father sent Jesus, so Jesus sent these apostles, literally translated sent ones', into the world to preach the good news (John 20:21).  Today's Church stands on the shoulders of these great men of God, who were chosen, commissioned and sent on mission by Jesus himself.  The Church is built on the foundation laid by the apostles.  The Church is  herself apostolic because she has been entrusted with the commission of handing on faithfully the “apostles’ teaching” (Acts 2:42).  In the words of the apostle Paul she has been commissioned to guard the good deposit that was entrusted to you – [to] guard it with the help of the Holy Spirit who lives in us (2 Tim. 1:13-14 NIV).

Although we don't tend to think in these terms when we attend Mass on a Sunday or celebrate the Eucharist during the week, the Church continues to be taught, sanctified and guided by the apostles until Christ's return.  In this task she is led and guided by the Pope, the successor of St Peter, and the College of Bishops, assisted by priests, but we too, by virtue of our baptism, are called to be 'ministers of the New Covenant, “servants of God”, “ambassadors for Christ” and “stewards of the mysteries of God”.  We should rejoice in this calling and be conscious of what a sacred calling it is to be a Christian.

However, there is one aspect of the apostles call that none of us can share in because their ministry was unique.  It is that they were chosen by Christ to be eyewitnesses of the Lord's foundation and so the foundation stones of the Church.  We owe these men, these heroes of faith, these men of courage and faith, a profound debt of gratitude for if the blood of the martyrs is the seed of the Church, so too is the witness of the apostles.  Praise God today for their faithfulness and obedience and stand in awe of their witness because they are truly giants of faith.

Jesus, you are the eternal Shepherd who never leaves his flock untended. Through the apostles you watch over us and protect us always. You made them shepherds of the flock to share in the work of your Son.

 

Chris

from Bible Alive

 

Hebrews 8:6–13 • Psalm 84(85):8, 10–14 • Mark 3:13–19

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